Monthly Archives: August 2017

Microphone or a Voice Amplifier

Their voice gets weakened and sometimes it is so bad that they are hardly able to whisper. People like these may find difficulty in communicating with their friends and family members over phone calls as well and might be compelled to use speakerphones in place of normal receivers. These are the people who are in dire need of voice amplifiers. Such equipment can really help in amplification of your voice even when you are speaking in a very low tone.

Another scenario where these equipment prove their ultimate usage is in teaching. The instructors often face problems regarding conveying instructions especially in larger areas like skating rinks or pools. It is especially a problem with respect to pools because the echoing effect of water and noise from all pool users and music that might be or might not be part of different programs that are going on. Though instructions can also be provided with visual cues, but there will always come a time when a participant would need clear instructions. Similar problems are faced by people in other kinds of speaking jobs.

A voice amplification system can always provide a simple solution to this problem. There are several types of voice amplification systems that are available in markets these days, the best ones are the portable voice amplifiers. Most of these also help enhance speech level of people who are suffering from permanent voice impairment or disability. Patients or subjects also have the option of body worn voice amplifiers that can be adorned by the person easily. These can really help disabled and weak people reach out to others and let them know what they wish to convey.

Body worn amplifiers mainly boost the voice level and help to keep vocal cords from stress and strain. It can really improve the quality of life for the person carrying this equipment. If it a pool or a group activity, it will definitely take the enjoyment level up and would help in making events or training sessions much more successful for participants. Life will get more pleasant and frustrations will be much less for the instructor whose life becomes a hell of the struggle to be heard by others. Misunderstandings are reduced and problems will be reduced to half both for the speakers and the receiver

 

Best Bands Who Have Y In Their Names

On my way home I began to consider that, if his remark had been sincere, all of the great bands he was missing because of his inexplicable dislike of the 25th letter of the alphabet. After all, two of the bands that highlighted the Woodstock festival fit that category, Iron Butterfly and Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young.

Here are fifteen of the other best bands who have a Y in their names.

The Cyrcle

Several covers of Simon and Garfunkel tunes became minor hits, but their biggest single was “Red Rubber Ball.”

Bad Company

One of rock’s first supergroups, formed from members of Free and Mott the Hoople, had a dozen hits like “Feel Like Makin’ Love” and “Can’t Get Enough” reach the charts.

My Morning Jacket

Jim James and his Louisville gang have been making indie rock for two decades, highlighted by records like Evil Urges and Water Fall.

Fountains of Wayne

Mostly known for the hit “Stacy’s Mom”, the band has recorded six outstanding albums since its inception in the mid-nineties.

The Byrds

Linguistically there is no Y in their name, but that letter distinguishes the group almost as much as its eclectic blend of rock, country and folk.

The Yardbirds

Both Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page had stints with this early rock ensemble, whose most memorable hit was “For Your Love.”

The Jayhawks

These guys keep getting better and better after twenty years of alternate country, thanks in part to the lyrics of Gary Louris.

Green Day

Billie Jo Armstrong fronts the most well-known current trio in rock, whose “Good Riddance (Time of Your Life)” has become a staple at graduation parties, wedding receptions, and TV shows like Seinfeld.

Journey

Most of their hits came during the eighties, but the band has soldiered on in spite of losing singer Steve Perry.

Styx

Like Journey, these eighties hit makers have continued performing in spite of the departure of their co-founder and singer, Dennis DeYoung.

Young Fresh Fellows

Now that Scott McCaughey is now in his sixties the first adjective does not really apply, but the music from these indie rock fellows still sounds fresh.

The Moody Blues

Justin Hayward and John Lodge co-founded the band, who has for the most part remained in tact from the sixties to make hits such as “Nights In White Satin” and “The Story In Your Eyes.

Pink Floyd

Dark Side of the Moon has often been labeled as the greatest album since Sergeant Pepper by The Beatles, but the quartet also made iconic records like The Wall and Wish You Were Here.

Good Music

While still at school I had a part-time job at a milk-bar café opposite the movie theatre in Bondi. As the movies played so did the music ring out across the street and some of it made me stop in my tracks. Artists like Mario Lanza still does it to me when his records play. So do others like Nat King Cole, Frankie Lane, Kathryn Grayson, Howard Keel, and the list goes on.

Who doesn’t love the music of Glen Miller and other bands like that of Bill Haley. But what have we got today to equal them? They didn’t yell or scream notes at you. They crooned and softly let you know that they were artists.

Today’s musicians have a different approach. The notes are still there but delivered in a more violent, raucous manner. The effect on the ears is hard and when played in shops and centers they frequently result in a head-ache. This was brought home to me again today while shopping for new shoes.

In shop after shop the music was annoying, very off-putting, and tiring. In the end I gave up after telling two of the young shop attendants of the damage it will do to their ears. The persistent loud noise is causing the cilia of the ears to react and this can lead to tinnitus and even deafness before they are much older. In the case of the former they will experience ringing in their ears which is constant and for which there is no cure.

Occasionally one hears a nice song played from those early days and my heart sing along with it. Generally, however, the noise of raucous tunes causes me to run away from it. Having been made aware of the danger of such it is appalling that the work-places of so many are spoiled and polluted with this material.

Music History

Moreover, my ideal music history would insist on providing an illustration for every assertion–no empty generalizations, please–and would draw all the musical examples for each composer from a single work, so that the repertoire for the history would be limited to twenty-four works, preferably music easily available on iTunes or YouTube. And for medieval music, generally based on plainsong, let the selections, so far as possible, be based on the same piece of plainsong.

Medieval

  • Plainsong, Kyrie Cunctipotens
  • Tuotilo of St. Gall, Kyrie Cunctipotens trope (ca. 900)
  • Cunctipotens genitor (St. Martial School, ca. 1125)
  • Anonymous, En non Diu-Quant voi-Eius in Oriente (13th century)
  • Machaut, Missa Nostre Dame (Kyrie, ca.1364)

Renaissance

  • Dufay, Ave regina coelorum (ca. 1464)
  • Josquin des Pres, Missa Pange Lingua (Agnus Dei; ca.1515)
  • Victoria, Missa O Magnum Mysterium (motet; Kyrie; 2nd half, 16th century)
  • Weelkes, As Vesta Was from Latmos Hill Descending (1601)

Baroque

  • Purcell, Dido and Aeneas (1689), “Dido’s Lament”
  • Buxtehude, Ein feste Burg (2nd half, 17th century)
  • Vivaldi, Concerto Grosso in A Minor, Op.3, No. 8 (1st movement, 1712)
  • Bach, Cantata 140, Wachet auf ruft uns die Stimme (1731) (1st movement)

Classic [46:00]

  • Haydn, String Quartet in C Major, Op. 73, No. 3 (1797) (1st movement)
  • Mozart, The Marriage of Figaro (1786) (Act II Finale)
  • Beethoven, Symphony No. 3 (1st movement, 1803)

Romantic [30:00]

  • Schubert, Erlkönig (1815)
  • Berlioz, Symphonie Fantastique (Dream of a Witches Sabbath, 1830)
  • Wagner, Prelude to Tristan und Isolde (1865)
  • Verdi, Otello (Act I, Drinking Song, 1887)

Modern [23:30]

  • Debussy, La Mer (Jeux de Vagues, 1905)
  • Schoenberg, Five Pieces for Orchestra, Op. 16 (Colors, 1909)
  • Stravinsky, Le Sacre du Printemps (First 4 movements, 1913)
  • Reich, Music for 18 Musicians (I. Pulses, 1976)

Finally, my ideal music history would describe the style of an individual composer or historical period in musical terms. At this point I run into an obstacle. The general public has embraced the vocabulary of art criticism and literary criticism so that one can analyze a painting or a poem without losing the reader. Music criticism enjoys no such common vocabulary, so that university students are often required to take courses in music theory before being permitted to take a music history course.